Choosing a Quaker

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If you are single and have a job that requires you to be away from home often, a Quaker would probably not be the ideal pet for you. On the other hand, a busy household whose occupants are involved in many extra-curricular activities may not have the time available that is needed to nurture a relationship with a Quaker. Every household is different, and the reasons for wanting a Quaker for a pet are also different.

Quakers are not pieces of furniture that were “such a good deal” that you decided you would take one home. They are living, breathing begins with their own needs, personal quirks and personalities. There is a vast difference in the ability to sustain a life and the ability to nurture it. These are things that must be determined and taken into consideration before you go any further.

Choosing a Quaker
After contemplating all the pros and cons of owning a Quaker, you may decide that a Quaker is the perfect pet for you and your family. After this first major hurdle is accomplished, locating a good source to purchase your pet from is the next step. In light of the fact that virtually no more wild-caught birds are allowed to be imported into the United States anymore, we are emphasizing the importance for people to purchase young, weaned, hand-fed Quakers from reputable sources.

Some good places to start are specialty stores that deal only in birds, general pet stores, or individual breeders, preferably in your immediate geographical area. Sources that are reputable should look and smell clean. Although it is perfectly acceptable to expect some bird-related mess, poorly kept surroundings stand out like a sore thumb.

Is the vendor himself clean and well-groomed? A vendor’s personal habits will often spill over into his business. A sloppy, unkempt vendor will often have sloppy unkempt cages, leading sometimes to unhappy, unhealthy birds. Most breeders tho won’t let you see the parents or other breeding birds in their aviary because you could bring a disease into the aviary, or upset the other breeding pairs in the room. This is not unusual behavior on the sellers part and should not be cause for alarm.


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